Biography

Geraldine “Tincy” Miller served on the State Board of Education from 1984-2010. In 2012 she was re-elected with 63% of the vote to the State Board of Education District 12.  On November 4, 2014 Tincy won re-election (approximately 62% of the vote) for a four year term. (2015-2019)

Throughout her tenure, Tincy distinguished herself by promoting better curricula and programs for dyslexic children, phonics-based reading curriculum standards, ensuring school textbooks are factual and historically correct, and protecting the original intent of the Permanent School Fund.

Tincy’s passion for improving public schools began when she was a reading specialist in the reading Laboratory at the Texas Scottish Rite Hospital, a place where children with the learning difference, Dyslexia, could learn to read, write and spell. There she saw the difficulties dyslexic children faced because their disability was ignored by the public school system. This led her to get involved on a road less traveled as an active member of the SBOE.

Tincy led a number of difficult battles motivated by her determination to make Texas’ public schools the best they can be.

  • She helped pass the first Dyslexia Law in Texas and the nation for public schools.
  • She was instrumental in the early assessment for children at risk for dyslexia and related disorders.
  • She facilitated the creation of the first Dyslexia Handbook in 1988.
  • She improved the textbook review and adoption process by having teachers review the books in their subject specialty.
  • She was a driving force behind the development of the first phonics-based curriculum in Texas in 1997.
  • She helped facilitate the first dyslexia academies.
  • She assisted in the first Dyslexia Licensure Bill.
  • Most recently, helped the fight to keep CSCOPE and Common Core out of our schools.

Tincy held a number of positions on the Board.

  • Vice-chair from 1999-2001.
  • Chair from 2003-2007.
  • Tincy also served on the Permanent School Fund sub-committee and on the Instruction Committee for the SBOE.

Tincy continues to stay involved in public education in Texas. Her years of experience on the State Board have made her a sound voice on the issues. In addition to her commitment to Texas school children, Tincy chairs a number of fundraising events for several organizations in her community. She and her late husband, Vance, have four adult children: Vance, Jr. (deceased), Cynthia Vance-Abrams, Vaughn and Greg, and eight grandchildren.